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PHMachuPicchu

Machu Picchu. 1977 (H.J. de Graaff) Single. Tube pale orange. Sepals flesh coloured, green tipped. Corolla deep orange with darker orange edge. Extremely free flowering, producing several buds per joint. Very strong grower with large smooth pale green leaves.
H.2. 2.75

 

 

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Madame Cornelissen. (Hardy) 1860 (Cornelissen). Semi-double. Tube and Sepals rich scarlet. Corolla white. Flowers longish, very free. Long buds. Grows vigorous, upright bush. 2-3ft (75-100cm.
H.3. but best grown. H.2. 2.50

 

 

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Magellanica alba (Hardy) Single. Tube and Sepals white. Corolla white flushed palest lavender pink. Very small flowers freely produced, Small medium green foliage. Very hardy. 4 - 5Ft (1.2 - 1.5m).
H.3. 2.50 

 

 

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Magellanica alba Variegata (Hardy) Single. Tube and sepals white. Corolla white flushed palest lavender pink. Very small flowers. Gold/green variegated foliage. 1-2ft (45 - 75cm).
H.3. 2.75

 

 

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Magic Flute. 1980 Single. Tube and Sepals white, long. Corolla coral rose. Medium size flowers very free. Basket variety.
H2. 2.50

 

 

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Mantilla. 1948 (Reiter). Single. Rich carmine self. Flowers long, free, borne in clusters. Tube long. Sepals and Corolla small. Excellent for standard work. Grows cascade. 
H.1. 2.75

 

 

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Marcia. (Smith) NZ Single. Tube and  Sepals red. Corolla violet. Excellent compact upright grower. We find this  variety a very striking bright colour.
H.2. 2.75

 

 

PHMarcusGraham

Marcus Graham. 1985 (Stubbs). Double. Tube white to flesh colour, long. Sepals dusky pink, fully reflexed, long and broad. Corolla opens dusky pink, streaked pale orange, maturing to dusky pink. Very large double frilly blooms in great abundance. Exotic colour. Very highly recommended.
H.2. 2.75

 

 

PHMargaret

Margaret. (Hardy) 1937 (Wood). Double. Sepals rose. Corolla mauve. Good size flowers, freely produced on a large bushy plant. 3-4ft (1-1.2m).
H.3 2.50

 

 

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Margaret Brown. (Hardy) 1949 (Wood). Single. Sepals salmon rose. Corolla magenta. Produces an abundance of small flowers. 3-4ft (1-1.2m).
H.3. 2.50

 

 

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Marin Glow. 1954 (Reedstorm). Single. Tube and Sepals pure white. Corolla rich purple ageing to magenta. Flowers medium, very free. A very good fuchsia. Grows upright bush. 
H.2. 2.50

 

 

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Marinka. 1902 (Rozain-Bouchariat). Single with the appearance of a semi-double. Tube and Sepals rich red. Corolla slightly darker. Flowers medium, very free. A nicely shaped bloom. This fuchsia is good for all types of work. Grows cascade.
H.2. But for showing. H.1. 2.50

 

 

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Mary. 1905 (Bonstedt). Single. Rich scarlet self. Flowers long, very free, borne in clusters. Tube long. Sepals and corolla small. A hybrid from F. triphylla. Grows upright bush.
H.1. 2.50

 

 

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Mary Lockyer. 1967 (Dr. O. Colville). Double. Tube and Sepals red, broad, underside has crepe appearance with green tips. Corolla pale lilac marbled red from topdownwards. Strong upright grower.
H.2. 2.50

 

 

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Mayfayre. 1967 (Dr. O. Colville). Double. Tube and Sepals red. Very broad sepals and short tube. Corolla white shaded carmine. Upright grower. Petals with rolled edges is the unusual feature of this fuchsia.
H.2. 2.50

 

 

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Meditation. (Hardy) 1956 (Blackwell). Semi-double. Tube and Sepals red. Corolla creamy white, veined cerise. Flowers medium and free. 1-2ft (45-75cm).
H.3. 2.50

 

 

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Mexicale Rose. 1962 (Machado). Single. Tube and Sepals cream and long. Corolla bright carmine. Grows free blooms carried on arching growth - most effective.
H.2. 2.50

 

 

PHMickeyGoult

Mickey Goult. 1981 Single. Tube and Sepals light pink. Corolla pale pink. Small flowers,very free, early flowering. Suitable for show work.
H.2. 2.50

 

 

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Microphylla. (Hardy) 1823 (Kris). Single. Tube deep red. Corolla rosy-pink, paling under glass. Tiny flowers borne singly in the leaf axils. Very small dark green leaves giving fern like effect overall. 2-3ft (75-90cm).
H.3. 2.50

 

 

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Mieke Meursing. 1969 (Hopgood). Single. Sepals red. Corolla pale pink with deeper veining and long stamens. Very free flowering and bushy.
H.2. 2.50

 

 

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Millenium.      2002 (Roes). Double. Tube and Sepals bright crimson. Corolla very dark purple  spoken of as being the black fuchsia. Excellent grower.
H.2.  2.75

 

 

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Ming. 1968 (K. Jennings). Single. Tube and Sepals orange-red, flushed cerise. Corolla cherry-red paling at base. Flowers smallish freely produced, light green foliage
H.2.  2.50

 

 

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Miss California. 1950 (Hodges). Semi-double. Tube and Sepals very pale pink. Corolla white, flushed pink. Flowers medium, very free. Corolla longish. A lovely delicate bloom. Makes a good show-class fuchsia. Delicately beautiful. Tends to cascade.
H.1. 2.50

 

 

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Mission Bells. 1948 (Walker and Jones). Single. Tube and Sepals red. Corolla rich purple. Flowers medium to largish, very free. Corolla bell-shaped with wavy-edged petals. Large red buds. This variety makes a good standard. 2-3ft (60-90cm).
H.2. In some parts  H.3. 2.50

 

 

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Money Spinner. 1974 (J. Lockyer). Single large. Tube and Sepals neyron rose, underside of sepals slightly deeper, long and curling. Corolla perfectly arranged, imperial purple, a very rich colouring. This large free flowering variety is also early to flower and well recommended for basket or standard work.
H.2. 2.50

 

 

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Moonbeam. 1982 (Mrs. M. Hall). Double. Tube yellow-green shaded pink, short. Sepals pale pink, deeper pink underside, long. Corolla white with pale pink splashes. Medium to large blooms freely produced on good shaped plant. The delicate colouring of this fuchsia has to be seen. 
H.2. 2.75

 

 

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Moonlight Sonata. (Blackwell). Single. Tube and Sepals bright pink, recurving. Corolla light purple, flushed and veined pink at base. A beautiful variety that will make a good standard, bush or basket.
H.2. 2.50

 

 

PHMoreApplause

More Applause. 1986 Double. Tube and Sepals ivory flushed pink, tube short, sepals broad. Corolla powder pink, streaked rose. Large flamboyant flowers, freely produced. Sport of the ever popular Applause.
H. 2. 2.75

 

 

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Mr. A. Hugget. Single. Sepals cerise. Corolla mauve-pink. Upright bush.
H.2. 2.50

 

 

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Mrs. Churchill. (Garson). Single. Tube and Sepals cherry red. Corolla pinkish-white, heavily veined crimson. Flowers largish, free. Spreading upright bush.
H.2. 2.50

 

 

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Mrs. Popple. (Hardy) 1899 (Elliot). Single. Tube and Sepals scarlet. Corolla dark violet. Flowers medium, free. Grows upright bush. 3-4ft (90cm-1.35m).
H.3. 2.50

 

 

PHMrsRundle

Mrs. Rundle. 1883 (Rundle). Single. Tube and Sepals flesh pink. Corolla rich orange vermilion. Flowers largish and long, very free and a very lovely bloom. Well tried show class fuchsia. Makes a good standard. Grows upright.
H.2. but for best results. H.1. 2.50

 

 

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Mrs. Wood. (Hardy) 1949 (Wood). Single. Tube and Sepals very pale pink. Corolla white. Small flowers covering well shaped plant. Upright bush. 4-5ft plus (1.2-1.5m).
H.3. 2.50

 

 

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Muriel. (British). Semi-double. Tube and Sepals scarlet. Corolla pale bluish-magenta, veined rose. Flowers largish, free. Flowers have a twisted appearance and are long. Grows definite cascade.
H.2. 2.50

 

 

PLEASE NOTE FOR WINTER MONTHS:

 H.1. requires greenhouse heated to minimum of 40F (4.5C).
 H.2. requires a cool greenhouse - half hardy.
 H.3. denotes the plant is hardy. The heights printed on the H3 varieties in this catalogue are an approximate guide to help your selection and planting layout and is the approximate height expected in the second growing season after a normal winter.

Although the above classifications are our recommendations, many of our customers are growing fuchsias that we classify as H.2 out of doors with good results and obviously with bigger blooms produced on H.2's than on
H.3's. It may be worth a try, the first winter being where greatest care is required (a good covering of peat is always beneficial).

The RHS and the British Fuchsia Society list many fuchsias that we classify as H2 medium hardy, as H3 hardy and with the climate changes (Global warming) this has probably become a fact
 

 

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Small Flowered

All plants in this list are priced for a plant in a peat block for mail order.
If collected from the nursery they will be in 3-inch pots.
Larger plants are usually available.


 

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A          B       C       D       E       F       G       H       I       J       K       L       M       N       O       P

Q       R       S       T       U/V       W       Species       Hardies       
Small Flowered